Coming up I hope :)

I have requested two interviews.

1. Eviction Lab, want to know what is happening with evictions in the USA. Check this site out https://evictionlab.org it's not pretty but it's important to talk about. So i have emailed and asked them for some insights.

2. I also contacted a site that does specialty tea sets. I hope to have someone from the site based in the UK contact me soon for an inerview.

3. I have also sent a request to two more people one expert on heat waves and a company that provides expert witnesses for trials.

C. T.

Monday, May 15, 2017

A Second Candd Conversation: The BRICK Paul Brechbuhler

My next interview is a revisit with a good friend and amateur boxer Paul Brechbuhler. Paul has put a lot of hard work into becoming a boxer, but unlike most boxers he is a bit older and this is what makes him a unique fighter.

Sadly last December his competition days were ended due to a KO in Hamilton Ontario. However that has not caused Paul known as the Brick to walk away from the ring, instead he is taking back his boxing desire and using it in a different way. I am happy to have him share that with us here on Candid Conversations. Paul welcome back and thanks for talking about what must be a tough moment for you.

Paul B.: Thank you for having me as part of Candid Conversations.

Cliff T.: From what I hear you went to do another bout, the Golden Gloves, on arrival you found out that you were not allowed to box and that you would not be allowed to compete at all in future events, devastating, shocking I am sure. That said what made you decide not to walk away from the sport?

Paul B.: As any athlete will tell you, when you love a sport so much, it is hard to leave. Especially when a third party is forcing you to do so.

Cliff T.: You have been boxing for a number of years, how many and how often were you competing?

Paul B.: I boxed when I was younger, but more recently I have been boxing for five years. About twice a year in competitive bouts.

Cliff T.: What was the coach’s reaction when he found out you were no longer allowed to compete?

Paul B.: He actually wanted me to keep training. Which I thought was rather odd.

Cliff T.: To say that it was like being KO’d again would be an understatement. Yet you are back boxing, what is the driving force here, and what do you want to accomplish outside of competition?

Paul B.: It is the warrior spirit. You know, once a fighter, always a fighter. If I can’t compete, I want to help others with the sport. Such as coaching or being an official.

Cliff T.: Do you have any comment or feedback you want to share with officials who were at the Golden Gloves event?

Paul B.: They should have told me that I did not qualify back in December, not on Golden Gloves day. I had put a lot of time and effort into training for that tournament. Not to mention almost $400 in fees and other expenses that I will likely not be able to get back.

Cliff T.: Looking ahead where do you see yourself in the boxing world In the future?

Paul B.: I don’t plan on leaving the sport for a while. I will be going for my referee’s license this summer, and will possibly look at coaching next year. I can also still do some demonstrations and exhibitions in the ring, albeit not full contact. Also, my community TV station. Metropolis TV, will continue to cover local boxing events, and we are also in the process of producing a documentary about the sport. In July 2017, I will be doing the ‘Another Brick In the Sprawl’ tour to promote Over 40 boxing through demonstrations and meet-ups. So far, Ottawa, Montreal, New York (City), and Chicago are on the list of cities I will be visiting. If it goes well, I may do it every year in different cities throughout North America.

Cliff T.: That is interesting. What is the message you want to send to officials and to those who want to be a boxer, especially those who are more mature in age?

Paul B.: I will always keep promoting boxing for older people. It is a great sport to get into as an older person. It was an unfortunate event that happened to me, and there is a long story behind it. This should not discourage anyone from getting into boxing at an older age. Knockouts are rare in amateur boxing, especially in the Over 40 division. I know a boxer who is 62, and can probably kick most of your butts. My being knocked out and subsequently banned from competition was due to an error by the officials who put me in the wrong division back in December. My opponent was too young and in a higher weight class. A rare mistake. The ban was due to the fact that in Ontario, our public healthcare does not cover injuries incurred from boxing, so I became a high-risk and could not be covered by the sanctioning oganization’s private policy. Even though I was cleared by a medical professional to be safe to box again. None of this is likely to happen again, and especially outside the province of Ontario, where boxing is generally covered by provincial heath plans.

Cliff T.: Paul would you say that boxing is more a young persons sport or do you disagree with that and why?

Paul B.: Boxing used to be a young person’s sport, but the number of participants in the Over 40 class has been increasing over the past few years. As I mentioned earlier, boxing is great for anyone. Boxing is a great exercise that works every muscle group and even helps to control high blood pressure, a condition common in older people.

Cliff T.: Paul it’s certainly been an interesting time for you. I have to say I am impressed by how you have handled this situation. We all know that kids are watching what adults do. What is the message you have for the younger boxer today?

Paul B.: Keep at it. Do your best, and give it your all. Listen to your coach, and take your training seriously.

Cliff T.: Paul once again thank you for taking time to chat about what is happening in your world re boxing. Much appreciated.

Paul B.: Thank you. I appreciate the opportunity to be part of your blog.
Paul Brechbuhler, aka the BRICK a boxer in transition from competition to a new venture in boxing joined me in a Candid Conversation from Toronto Canada.

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